Ken Scott

There’s no question that producer/engineer Ken Scott holds a unique place in music history. As one of only five engineers on The Beatles records, Ken’s work has left an indelible mark on hundreds of millions of fans with his skilled contributions to Magical Mystery Tour and The White Album. As producer of four David Bowie albums (including the seminal The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars) and two of the biggest-selling Supertramp albums (Crime of the Century and Crisis? What Crisis?), the sound Ken crafted has influenced several generations of music makers.

Those credits alone would be enough to set his name in the annals of music, but that’s only a brief slice of what Ken has done...

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Larry Harris, Casablanca Records

Larry Harris was Executive Vice President and co-founder of Casablanca Records, with Neil Bogart, Cecil Holmes, and Buck Reingold. Harris was with the label from its inception in November 1973 through July 1979.

Casablanca was founded in 1973 by former Buddah Records executive Neil Bogart, who named the label in homage to the classic film, Casablanca. He partnered with Cecil Holmes, Larry Harris and Buck Reingold in 1973, and was based in Los Angeles. The label was formed after they left Buddah and secured financing by Warner Bros. Records to start the venture. Casablanca became one of the most successful labels of the 1970s, signing and releasing albums by such acts as Kiss, Donna Summer, Village People, Cher, Lipps Inc...

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Marti Smiley Child & Jeff March

Where Have All the Pop Stars Gone? — Volume 2 contains chapters about seven musical groups or soloists. Each chapter begins with an introductory essay recounting the hit-making achievements of each soloist or band with an accompanying discography, then is subdivided into “epilogues” about the lives of each of the performers. The featured performers are:

• The Buckinghams, a Chicago-bred quintet whose songs include the chart-topping hit “Kind of a Drag” and the top-10 songs “Don’t You Care” and “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy.” The hybrid “pop-rock horn sound” that the band innovated would later be embraced by other bands, including Blood, Sweat and Tears, Chase, and Chicago...

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Patrick Carlin

Patrick Carlin, author of “Highway 23, The Unrepentant” and “Looking for ‘Quien F!#kin’ Sabe?’” was Conceived on New Year’s Day 1931, thanks to the Rhythm System, and born on October 1 1931. Patrick Carlin, the older brother of George Carlin wrote for the Gong Show, Thicke of the Night, and the George Carlin Show.

Patrick grew up in an America that was going through changes. He graduated from Cardinal Hayes High School in NYC. Joined the Air Force at 19 and served in exotic places like Texas, Biloxi, MS, Michigan, Alaska, and California. He had 11 rank changes, up and down. He was honorably discharged after 4 yrs, with one Stripe, no Good Conduct Medal and no re-elistment talk, but man did he have fun!!!

Patrick Carlin moved back to the old neighborhood and began working ...

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Rob Shanahan

Rob Shanahan is recognized as one of music’s most published photographers. He has photographed such iconic musicians as Ringo StarrPaul McCartney, and Keith Richards. Rob’s photographs include intimate shots of the musicians such as Eddie Van HalenJoe Walsh, andChristina Aguilera. Behind the scene shots of  Sheila E.Tommy Lee, and Dave Navarro. As well as studio, onstage and backstage as well, Rob Shanahan, has captured your favorite artist at their best.

A musician himself, Shanahan first started playing the drums at 11, then picked up his first camera at 12. Since 2003 he has been the chief photographer for Yamaha Music, He has photographed hundreds of Yamaha endorsed artists like Elton JohnBarry ManilowSammy Hagar. All of which are included in his book, V...

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Shadoe Stevens

RADIO AND TELEVISION
He was the first program director of “World Famous” KROQ-FM. He created one of the first Alternative Rock formats in the country. As Vice President of Programming, he created a new music format that consisted of nothing but “cutting edge, exciting new music. As both PD and on-air personality, the “attitude” he developed, combined with this new musical “niche,” resulted in astonishing acceptance in a very short time. Within 6 months it became a number one station. As a radio personality during this period, he won the Billboard Magazine Personality of the Year Award.
After leaving radio for the worlds of television and film, in 1988, he was offered the position of hosting American Top Forty...

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Shotgun Tom Kelly

Shotgun Tom” Kelly has been entertaining Southern California radio audiences for almost 50 years, and is now in his 18th year in the afternoon slot on LA’s K-EARTH 101.
PPB President Chuck Street presented “Shotgun Tom” with the Art Gilmore Career Achievement Award after a dais of Tom’s friends and colleagues related some extremely humorous “off-the-air” stories about the honoree.
”Shotgun Tom” rose to fame in his native San Diego working at radio stations KGB, KOGO, B-100 and most notably, KCBQ, where he gained national acclaim. When KRTH sought a successor to the “Real” Don Steele after his death in August of 1997, “Shotgun Tom” was the obvious choice...

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Scott King

“I got screwed by Tommy Lee Engineer Scott King claim’s that Tommy Lee, of Motley Crue, took his Roller Coaster drum set design.

In 1991 Scott King designed the roller coaster drum set. He approached several bands with his designs and Tommy Lee ofMotely Crue was one of those people. He never heard back from Tommy Lee and moved onto other bands. 20 years later Tommy Lee took the concept, called it his own and appeared on stage with the roller coaster drum set.

Scott King would like to be acknowledged as the brains behind the wicked-cool drum set. It was his concept and design idea. He put the time and the creativity into the development of this concept and should be compensated for his part.

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William “Mickey” Stevenson

Motown’s first A&R man

William “Mickey” Stevenson showed up at Hitsville,a.k.a. Motown,for an audition one day with an official-looking briefcase and a big, easy grin. Sharply dressed, hip, fast-talking, Mickey was street, much more street than I was. I could see he was an Eastside graduate while I was still sort of that Westside boy at heart. I liked him a lot. Then he sang a song. I liked him less. “Your singing is okay,” I said, “But I just don’t need another singer right now. What I really need is an A&R director. Can you do that?” Motown Founder Berry Gordy from his book “To Be Loved.”]

Thus began the career of William “Mickey” Stevenson at legendary Motown Records. In his recently published self-penned book titled ‘Motown’s First A &R Man Presents The A &am...

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Vincent Bitetti of Bluebeard

Bluebeard guitarist and business manager Vincent Bitetti, recently re-connected with Darrell Wayne to bring him up to date on what the band was up to. Although Darrell introduced the band at a few shows in the past few years (the band opened for Kansas, Blue Oyster Cult and Foghat in 2009), they have a history that goes back to the late seventies – when Darrell was the Program Director at KROQ in Los Angeles.

Vincent Bitetti caught up with Darrell last year to get some friendly advice about a project he was working on called The Story Of Bluebeard. In 1979, Bluebeard was so popular in Southern California that they could sell out venues with up to . 5,000 seat capacity. They routinely sold out the Whisky A – Go – Go on weekends with double encores being the norm...

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